Text for Tired Eyes – by Tyler Knott


This is an ode to all of those that have never asked for one.

A thank you in words to all of those that do not do

what they do so well for the thanking.

This is to the mothers.

This is to the ones who match our first scream

with their loudest scream; who harmonize in our shared pain

and joy and terrified wonder when life begins.

This is to the mothers.

To the ones who stay up late and wake up early and always know

the distance between their soft humming song and our tired ears.

To the lips that find their way to our foreheads and know,

somehow always know, if too much heat is living in our skin.

To the hands that spread the jam on the bread and the mesmerizing

patient removal of the crust we just cannot stomach.

This is to the mothers.

To the ones who shout the loudest and fight the hardest and sacrifice

the most to keep the smiles glued to our faces and the magic

spinning through our days.  To the pride they have for us

that cannot fit inside after all they have endured.

To the leaking of it out their eyes and onto the backs of their

hands, to the trails of makeup left behind as they smile

through those tears and somehow always manage a laugh.

This is to the patience and perseverance and unyielding promise

that at any moment they would give up their lives to protect ours.

This is to the mothers.

To the single mom’s working four jobs to put the cheese in the mac

and the apple back into the juice so their children, like birds in

a nest, can find food in their mouths and pillows under their heads.

To the dreams put on hold and the complete and total rearrangement

of all priority.  This is to the stay-at-home moms and those that

find the energy to go to work every day; to the widows and the

happily married.

To the young mothers and those that deal with the unexpected

announcement of a new arrival far later than they ever anticipated.

This is to the mothers.

This is to the sack lunches and sleepover parties, to the soccer games

and oranges slices at halftime.  This is to the hot chocolate

after snowy walks and the arguing with the umpire

at the little league game. To the frosting ofbirthday cakes

and the candles that are always lit on time; to the Easter egg hunts,

the slip-n-slides and the iced tea on summer days.

This is to the ones that show us the way to finding our own way.

To the cutting of the cord, quite literally the first time

and even more painfully and metaphorically the second time around.

To the mothers who become grandmothers and great-grandmothers

and if time is gentle enough, live to see the children of their children

have children of their own.  To the love.

My goodness to the love that never stops and comes from somewhere

only mothers have seen and know the secret location of.

To the love that grows stronger as their hands grow weaker

and the spread of jam becomes slower and the Easter eggs get easier

to find and sack lunches no longer need making.

This is to the way the tears look falling from the smile lines

around their eyes and the mascara that just might always be

smeared with the remains of their pride for all they have created.

This is to the mothers.

via Tyler Knott.

I love the dark hours of my being


I love the dark hours of my being

in which my senses drop into the deep.

I have found in them, as in old letters,

My private life, that is already lived through,

And become wide and powerful now, like legends.

Then I know that there is room in me

For a second huge and timeless life.

– Rainer Maria Rilke (translated by Robert Bly)

How meditation can influence gene activity | Scope Blog


A growing body of scientific evidence shows that mindful-based therapies, such as meditation, can lower psychological stress and boost both mental and physical health. Now findings recently published in PLoS One suggest that such practices may also change gene activity.

In the small study, researchers recruited individuals who had no prior meditation experience and examined participants’ genetic profile prior to their adoption of a basic daily relaxation practice. The 10- to 20-minute routine included reciting words, breathing exercises and attempts to exclude everyday thought. The New Scientist reports:

After eight weeks of performing the technique daily, the volunteers gene profile was analysed again. Clusters of important beneficial genes had become more active and harmful ones less so.

The boosted genes had three main beneficial effects: improving the efficiency of mitochondria, the powerhouse of cells; boosting insulin production, which improves control of blood sugar; and preventing the depletion of telomeres, caps on chromosomes that help to keep DNA stable and so prevent cells wearing out and ageing.

Clusters of genes that became less active were those governed by a master gene called NF-kappaB, which triggers chronic inflammation leading to diseases including high blood pressure, heart disease, inflammatory bowel disease and some cancers.

Even more interesting was that researchers found evidence to suggest that such changes can occur quickly and that regularly meditating can have lasting health effects:

By taking blood immediately after before and after performing the technique on a single day, researchers also showed that the gene changes happened within minutes.

For comparison, the researchers also took samples from 26 volunteers who had practised relaxation techniques for at least three years. They had beneficial gene profiles even before performing their routines in the lab, suggesting that the techniques had resulted in long term changes to their genes.

via How meditation can influence gene activity | Scope Blog.

A Mindful Writer: An Interview with Diana Gould | Mindfulness and Psychotherapy


I would very much want them to know that what seems endless is not.  That there are very concrete and specific ways of being with painful emotions and experiences that can help transform them. That very often what we think is the worst thing that could happen to us turns out to be the best.  That if we have the courage to open to the darkness and not run from it, it can contain the source of our relief.  That as Rumi has said, “the wound is where the light enters.”  That happiness is possible.  Freedom is possible. That everything we could possibly want is contained within each present moment, if we just learn how to recognize it.

via A Mindful Writer: An Interview with Diana Gould | Mindfulness and Psychotherapy.